Working to Raise the Bar

Published 26-Jan-2017

Quebec’s Diverse Aerospace Players Continue to Impress (Helicopters Magazine)- By Brian Dunn
While much of the aerospace attention in Quebec is garnered by major aerospace leaders such as Bombardier Aerospace, Pratt & Whitney Canada, Bell Helicopter Textron Canada and CAE, the world’s third-largest cluster is driven by some 40,000 employees who create some of the most diverse and cutting-edge aerospace products in the world.

There are thousands of players in the Canadian aerospace industry, most of them flying under the radar as they try to build a solid client base along with a reputation as a reliable supplier. Many of these firms reside in Quebec, where more than 200 aerospace companies generated more than $15.5 billion in sales in 2015.

And while much of the aerospace attention in Quebec is garnered by major aerospace leaders such as Bombardier Aerospace, Pratt & Whitney Canada, Bell Helicopter Textron Canada and CAE, the world’s third-largest cluster is driven by some 40,000 employees who create some of the most diverse and cutting-edge aerospace products in the world.

To highlight the province’s aerospace depth and influence, Helicopters has identified a selection of small but potent aerospace firms making noise here and on the global stage.

The TRAXXALL Technologies executive team (from left): Mark Steinbeck, president; Scott Henderson, CEO; Vittorio Armenti, vice president, operations; Aviv Ohayon, director, system and product development; Giovanni Montanaro, director, operations. (Photo courtesy TRAXXALL Technologies)

 

Providing innovation in maintenance
TRAXXALL Technologies, Montreal TRAXXALL executives maintain the firm delivers the most innovative aircraft maintenance tracking system on the market today – and they just might be right. Founded in 2013, TRAXXALL has sales and support staff across the U.S., and a sales office in London, serving Europe, Middle East, Asia and Africa.

It launched its new Inventory Management Module (IMM) at the 2016 NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition in Orlando this past November. The product modernizes and simplifies the inventory management of components used in business aircraft maintenance. It is also actively trying to grow it’s rotary-wing business.

IMM improves aircraft maintenance work flow by simplifying the creation of purchase orders, accelerating the receipt of new parts and providing superior transparency of inventory status across multiple locations. Fully integrated with TRAXXALL’s aircraft maintenance tracking system, IMM allows operators to reduce aircraft downtimes during scheduled maintenance milestones.

“Over the past few years, we have paid close attention to feedback from business aircraft operators, specifically directors of maintenance and parts managers,” said Mark Steinbeck, president, TRAXXALL. “We have learned that inventory management is one of the weak links in legacy maintenance tracking systems. This is a major issue because the availability of replacement parts is often the most important factor in getting an aircraft back into service.”

TRAXXALL developed its cloud-based IMM which requires a password to access an operator’s data and uses the information to track and better plan their maintenance, explained Steinbeck who works out of Denver.

“It could be used by airlines. In fact, we have a couple of Boeings that are privately owned, but large airlines like Air Canada have larger programs that handle things like catering and scheduling in addition to maintenance.”

With some 500 aircraft customers, including helicopters, TRAXXALL is relatively small compared to 40-year-old leader Camp Systems with 18,000 aircraft and 12-year-old Flightdocs with 2,000 aircraft. But it’s adding about 25 aircraft a month to its client list.

“Fixed wing represents about 80 per cent of our business, because they’re accustomed to full-service maintenance tracking providers, whereas rotary traditionally uses spread sheets. Helicopter operators really like our system, but some operators find the annual subscription of $2,000 cost prohibitive.”

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